Solutions for Exam: Mapping Problems

Thanks for undertaking the Exam on Mapping Problems. We hope you found it worthwhile. Here are the solutions.

An issue tree can have two problem statements
False. An issue tree must have only one problem statement. Synthesis drives this. If you have two high level issues you should ask, “What is the overarching or meta level issue that these support?” If there is no meta level issue then you have two distinct problems and projects.

MECE stands for Mutually Exclusive Collectively Eliminated
False. MECE stands for Mutually Exclusive and Collectively Exhaustive. It is a categorisation tool that tests if your issues or hypotheses are separate (mutually exclusive) and cover everything (collectively exhaustive). Frameworks help you know if your issues are MECE.

MECE stands for Mutually Exclusive Collectively Exhaustive
True. MECE stands for Mutually Exclusive and Collectively Exhaustive. It is a categorisation tool that tests if your issues or hypotheses are separate (mutually exclusive) and cover everything (collectively exhaustive). Frameworks help you know if your issues are MECE.

An issue tree can have more than three branches
True. An issue tree could theoretically have as many branches as you like provided they are MECE. However, it makes sense to group into manageable MECE groups that are logically right and sensible packages of work.

The purpose of the issue tree is to drive the workplan
True. The issue tree is simply a tool to help you logically think through how you are going to think about the problem! It is not an end in itself, although it can be a very valuable tool to help your “client” see the problem.